Musquee de Provence Pumpkin    Photo ©Evie Saffron Strands    NOVEMBER    The end of October brought a shift from Scottish Chanterelles and Girolles to fungi from France and Italy.  Muscat and Chasselas Grapes saw October out and the French Quince arrived to perfume our shelves.  English Apple and Pear varieties changed through the month and Winter Squash and Pumpkins swept away any attempt at denial that mid-autumn had arrived, despite some beautiful warm days in London.

Musquee de Provence Pumpkin

Photo ©Evie Saffron Strands

NOVEMBER

The end of October brought a shift from Scottish Chanterelles and Girolles to fungi from France and Italy.  Muscat and Chasselas Grapes saw October out and the French Quince arrived to perfume our shelves.  English Apple and Pear varieties changed through the month and Winter Squash and Pumpkins swept away any attempt at denial that mid-autumn had arrived, despite some beautiful warm days in London.

  Chicoria  (Catalogna Naturala)   Photo ©Evie Saffron Strands   Right now, produce coming through our doors is truly autumnal.  The array of earthy root vegetables and mildly bitter brassicas is increasing by the week.  Italy and France are contributing too with Artichokes, Radishes and Chicories.  Navelina Oranges are already arriving from Italy to top up the Clementines coming in from both Italy and Spain.   Writing on 3 November, we see:   British  Brassicas  including  Black Cabbage  (Cavolo Nero) and  Kale ,  Brussel Sprouts  and  Brussel Tops ,  Cauliflower  and  Romanesco , deep-green, crinkly  Savoy Cabbage  and beautiful green and purple  January King Cabbage .  English  Purple Sprouting Broccoli  and outstanding  Rainbow Chard  bring vibrancy to the arch.  Root vegetables including  Swede ,  Beetroot , organic  Heritage Carrots ,  Parsley Root ,  Celeriac  and  Jerusalem Artichokes  are all British grown this week, as are the  Leeks  and the first  Fenland Celery .  Eau de Nil  Kohlrabi  and small white  Tokyo Turnips  from Italy and, of course, we have  Roscoff Onions  from France.  From France we have various crunchy  Radishes  and fat cigar-like  Salsify .     From Italy, the cold-weather bitter greens are coming into their own with  Puntarelle  (Catalogna),  Chicoria  (Catalogna Naturala), and  Cime di Rapa  (Rapini).  More ‘bitters’ are here in the form of  Radicchio   Treviso ,  Castelfranco  and  Escarole  and we have beautiful  Spiky Artichokes  from Sardinia too.    Winter Squash  and  Pumpkins  are to the fore now, including English  Red Kuri (Onion Squash) , French  Spaghetti Squash  and  Musquee de Provence Pumpkins  and  Delica Pumpkins  from Italy.    Watercress  from our Sussex Farmer continues to arrive and we have English  Walnuts  too.   Mushrooms  from Europe this week include Chanterelles, Porcini, Milk Caps (Lactarius) and orange/white hued Ovoli (named for its resemblance to an egg when very young).   Potato  varieties are increasing.  This week we have  Cyprus  and  Desiree  and both of our waxy-fleshed favourites: English  Pink Fir Apple  and  La Ratte  from France.     Lautrec Garlic  and  Smoked Garlic  from France continue.     Apple  varieties from our Kent farmer this week are  Cox,   Spartan  and  Russet  and we have  Bramley  cooking apples from them too.  The  Pears  have been particularly good this year and we have varieties  Comice  and  Conference .    Pomegranates  this week come from Sicily and Spain.  We also have ripe  Cachi/Persimmons  from Italy and large  Quince  from France.   Navelina Oranges  have arrived from Italy.  They are early so some are a little on the sharp side but perfect for making Caramelised Oranges if they prove too sharp for your taste, and there are  Clementines  too.

Chicoria (Catalogna Naturala)

Photo ©Evie Saffron Strands

Right now, produce coming through our doors is truly autumnal.  The array of earthy root vegetables and mildly bitter brassicas is increasing by the week.  Italy and France are contributing too with Artichokes, Radishes and Chicories.  Navelina Oranges are already arriving from Italy to top up the Clementines coming in from both Italy and Spain.  Writing on 3 November, we see:

British Brassicas including Black Cabbage (Cavolo Nero) and Kale, Brussel Sprouts and Brussel Tops, Cauliflower and Romanesco, deep-green, crinkly Savoy Cabbage and beautiful green and purple January King Cabbage.

English Purple Sprouting Broccoli and outstanding Rainbow Chard bring vibrancy to the arch.

Root vegetables including Swede, Beetroot, organic Heritage Carrots, Parsley Root, Celeriac and Jerusalem Artichokes are all British grown this week, as are the Leeks and the first Fenland Celery.

Eau de Nil Kohlrabi and small white Tokyo Turnips from Italy and, of course, we have Roscoff Onions from France.

From France we have various crunchy Radishes and fat cigar-like Salsify.   

From Italy, the cold-weather bitter greens are coming into their own with Puntarelle (Catalogna), Chicoria (Catalogna Naturala), and Cime di Rapa (Rapini).  More ‘bitters’ are here in the form of Radicchio Treviso, Castelfranco and Escarole and we have beautiful Spiky Artichokes from Sardinia too. 

Winter Squash and Pumpkins are to the fore now, including English Red Kuri (Onion Squash), French Spaghetti Squash and Musquee de Provence Pumpkins and Delica Pumpkins from Italy. 

Watercress from our Sussex Farmer continues to arrive and we have English Walnuts too.

Mushrooms from Europe this week include Chanterelles, Porcini, Milk Caps (Lactarius) and orange/white hued Ovoli (named for its resemblance to an egg when very young).

Potato varieties are increasing.  This week we have Cyprus and Desiree and both of our waxy-fleshed favourites: English Pink Fir Apple and La Ratte from France.  

Lautrec Garlic and Smoked Garlic from France continue.  

Apple varieties from our Kent farmer this week are Cox, Spartan and Russet and we have Bramley cooking apples from them too.  The Pears have been particularly good this year and we have varieties Comice and Conference

Pomegranates this week come from Sicily and Spain.  We also have ripe Cachi/Persimmons from Italy and large Quince from France.

Navelina Oranges have arrived from Italy.  They are early so some are a little on the sharp side but perfect for making Caramelised Oranges if they prove too sharp for your taste, and there are Clementines too.

  Sicilian Pomegranates    Photo ©Evie Saffron Strands   So, in the final month of autumn,  what produce can we     expect to see during the rest of November?      Brassicas  including  Black Cabbage  (Cavolo Nero),  Kale  and  Kohlrabi ,  Brussel Sprouts  and  Brussel Tops ,  Cauliflower  and  Romanesco , deep-green, crinkly  Savoy Cabbage  beautiful green and purple  January King Cabbage .  Most will only benefit from a little cold weather as winter approaches.  Root vegetables will come more to the fore, including  Tokyo Turnips,   Swede , British organic  Heritage Carrots ,  Parsley Root, Celeriac  and  Jerusalem Artichokes.   Fat cigar-like  Salsify  and  Artichokes  will be around too.   English Leeks  will only get better and short-season  Fenland Celery  should be with us throughout the month, as should  Rainbow Chard .  The cold weather bitter greens from Italy will continue including  Puntarelle  (Catalogna),  Chicoria  (Catalogna Naturala), and  Cime di Rapa  (Rapini).  Bitter leaved  Escarole ,  Castelfranco  and the  Radicchio  family will start to stand out on the shelves.   Winter Squash  and  Pumpkins  like  Red Kuri (Onion Squash) ,  Spaghetti Squash ,  Musquee de Provence Pumpkins  and  Delica Pumpkins .    Watercress  from our Sussex Farmer should continue through November.  The  Potato  crop is all harvested and varieties we buy will vary.  We will continue to have  Roscoff Onions .   Apple  and  Pear  harvests are drawing to a close and we will continue to have varieties supplied by our Kent farmer during the month.      Pomegranates  and  Quince  should be on the shelves throughout November and we should have  Cachi/Persimmon  into November too.  The  Navelina Oranges  and  Clementines  should be joined by more varieties of citrus during November.  We are as keen as our customers to see the new season crop on our shelves.   As we mourn the loss of late summer/early autumn  Tomatoes , we look forward to the arrival of crunchy, salty  Camone  and  Marinda .  Later in the month we will be stocking up on  Nuts  in their shells,  Dried Fruits , FRESH  Cranberries  and vacuum-packed  Chestnuts  for those customers who want to shop early for Christmas.

Sicilian Pomegranates

Photo ©Evie Saffron Strands

So, in the final month of autumn, what produce can we expect to see during the rest of November?  

Brassicas including Black Cabbage (Cavolo Nero), Kale and Kohlrabi, Brussel Sprouts and Brussel Tops, Cauliflower and Romanesco, deep-green, crinkly Savoy Cabbage beautiful green and purple January King Cabbage.  Most will only benefit from a little cold weather as winter approaches.

Root vegetables will come more to the fore, including Tokyo Turnips, Swede, British organic Heritage Carrots, Parsley Root, Celeriac and Jerusalem Artichokes.  Fat cigar-like Salsify and Artichokes will be around too.  English Leeks will only get better and short-season Fenland Celery should be with us throughout the month, as should Rainbow Chard.

The cold weather bitter greens from Italy will continue including Puntarelle (Catalogna), Chicoria (Catalogna Naturala), and Cime di Rapa (Rapini).  Bitter leaved Escarole, Castelfranco and the Radicchio family will start to stand out on the shelves.

Winter Squash and Pumpkins like Red Kuri (Onion Squash), Spaghetti Squash, Musquee de Provence Pumpkins and Delica Pumpkins

Watercress from our Sussex Farmer should continue through November.

The Potato crop is all harvested and varieties we buy will vary.  We will continue to have Roscoff Onions.

Apple and Pear harvests are drawing to a close and we will continue to have varieties supplied by our Kent farmer during the month.   

Pomegranates and Quince should be on the shelves throughout November and we should have Cachi/Persimmon into November too.

The Navelina Oranges and Clementines should be joined by more varieties of citrus during November.  We are as keen as our customers to see the new season crop on our shelves. 

As we mourn the loss of late summer/early autumn Tomatoes, we look forward to the arrival of crunchy, salty Camone and Marinda.

Later in the month we will be stocking up on Nuts in their shells, Dried Fruits, FRESH Cranberries and vacuum-packed Chestnuts for those customers who want to shop early for Christmas.

 Umami Sea Slaw    Photo © Puntarelle&Co Ltd     NEW in the Fridge:     Umami Sea Slaw Ferment   This week we have added seaweed to our Cabbage ferment to give extra beneficial minerals to this high Vitamin C vegetable.  We think this brings a delicious umami flavour to the ferment and makes it a particularly good accompaniment to fish dishes. 

Umami Sea Slaw

Photo © Puntarelle&Co Ltd

NEW in the Fridge: 

Umami Sea Slaw Ferment

This week we have added seaweed to our Cabbage ferment to give extra beneficial minerals to this high Vitamin C vegetable.  We think this brings a delicious umami flavour to the ferment and makes it a particularly good accompaniment to fish dishes. 

  Pumpkin & Orange Spice Water Kefir    Photo © Puntarelle&Co Ltd    Our thoughts are turning to a festive Christmas and with this in mind we have introduced this seasonal Water Kefir made with new season pumpkin and Navelina Orange.  With notes of orange and gingerbread, we think this warming Kefir catches the mood of the time of year perfectly.  Like all our Water Kefirs, this unpasteurized probiotic drink brings beneficial micro-organisms, B vitamins, minerals and enzymes in a slightly sour, zingy, low sugar form.    More about our range of Fermented products at:    www. londonfermentary.com

Pumpkin & Orange Spice Water Kefir

Photo © Puntarelle&Co Ltd

Our thoughts are turning to a festive Christmas and with this in mind we have introduced this seasonal Water Kefir made with new season pumpkin and Navelina Orange.  With notes of orange and gingerbread, we think this warming Kefir catches the mood of the time of year perfectly.  Like all our Water Kefirs, this unpasteurized probiotic drink brings beneficial micro-organisms, B vitamins, minerals and enzymes in a slightly sour, zingy, low sugar form.  

More about our range of Fermented products at: www. londonfermentary.com

  English Cox Apples    Photo ©Evie Saffron Strands   It’s hard to beat a Bramley for a classic apple pie or crumble but where less acidic, firm-fleshed apples are needed, reach for varieties like Laxton Fortune, Cox, Russet, the Blenheim or Braeburn.  All have a good balance of sour and sweet. Spices such as anise, cinnamon, nutmeg and vanilla pair well with apples.  We like to keep these monthly recipes seasonal and easy and this one definitely ticks both boxes.  It comes from Jane Grigson’s invaluable ‘Fruit Book’ and the results are delicious.   If you first clarify the butter, its catch-point is higher so you don’t have to watch the cooking constantly, but it’s not essential to do this.  You could also use pears in this recipe if you prefer.   Buttered Apples   (Serves 1)  30g butter (clarified or unclarified)  1 Apple  2 generous tablespoons caster sugar  A little cinnamon (optional)  A little water, cider or apple juice  A little cream (single, double or whipping)  A small knob of butter  Peel, core and cut the apple into eight wedges.  Sprinkle with lemon juice to stop oxidisation if you aren’t ready to cook them immediately.  Heat the butter in a frying pan, dry the apples slices and cook them gently in a single layer.  When the underside turns golden brown, turn the slices over and sprinkle with the caster sugar.  Cook until caramelised then add the sprinkling of cinnamon, if using.  Lift the slices onto a serving dish.  Deglaze the pan with a little water, cider or apple juice (you can also add a little Calvados now, if you like).  Keep stirring and add a little cream to make a sauce.  Add the small knob of butter then pour the sauce over the apples and serve.  

English Cox Apples

Photo ©Evie Saffron Strands

It’s hard to beat a Bramley for a classic apple pie or crumble but where less acidic, firm-fleshed apples are needed, reach for varieties like Laxton Fortune, Cox, Russet, the Blenheim or Braeburn.  All have a good balance of sour and sweet. Spices such as anise, cinnamon, nutmeg and vanilla pair well with apples.  We like to keep these monthly recipes seasonal and easy and this one definitely ticks both boxes.  It comes from Jane Grigson’s invaluable ‘Fruit Book’ and the results are delicious.   If you first clarify the butter, its catch-point is higher so you don’t have to watch the cooking constantly, but it’s not essential to do this.  You could also use pears in this recipe if you prefer.

Buttered Apples  (Serves 1)

30g butter (clarified or unclarified)

1 Apple

2 generous tablespoons caster sugar

A little cinnamon (optional)

A little water, cider or apple juice

A little cream (single, double or whipping)

A small knob of butter

Peel, core and cut the apple into eight wedges.  Sprinkle with lemon juice to stop oxidisation if you aren’t ready to cook them immediately.

Heat the butter in a frying pan, dry the apples slices and cook them gently in a single layer.  When the underside turns golden brown, turn the slices over and sprinkle with the caster sugar.  Cook until caramelised then add the sprinkling of cinnamon, if using.  Lift the slices onto a serving dish.

Deglaze the pan with a little water, cider or apple juice (you can also add a little Calvados now, if you like).  Keep stirring and add a little cream to make a sauce.  Add the small knob of butter then pour the sauce over the apples and serve.